101 Rejection Reference Database – Art Unit 2153

PATENT EXAMINER: STRANGE, AARON

SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR MEDIATION USING NLP AND MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

PATENT ASSIGNEE

CAMERON MITCHELL

PATENT APPLICATION
16/582849
PATENT ABSTRACT

A system described herein may provide techniques for using machine learning and/or other techniques to monitor a conversation between two or more conversation participants through a messaging program. The system may utilize natural language processing (“NLP”) to determine the intent of phrases and/or words sent between mediation participants. The system may determine to take remedial measures, such as modifying, delaying, and/or rejecting a message from one of the participants when a score for the message exceeds a dynamic score threshold determined by the system based on one or more factors, such as the demographic information ofthe mediation participants, nature of the mediation, length of mediation, communications among mediation participants, and/or other factors.

REASON FOR 101 REJECTION    |   

The patent claims recite processing a message to generate a score, identifying a remedial action, and performing the remedial action which all fall within the group of certain methods of organizing human activity since they recite a method for facilitating or conducting a mediation session between human participants. The claims additionally fall within the grouping of “mental process” since generating a score, comparing the score to a threshold, and selecting a remedial action to perform may be performed solely in the human mind.

Remarks on Overcoming the 101 Rejection    |    REM 1/18/2021

Patent Applicant amended their patent claims to tie message interactions to user equipment (UE), and claimed method stages with respect to the user equipment. In the remarks, the Patent Applicant then cited to U.S.P.T.O. Memorandum regarding Changes in Examination Procedure Pertaining to Patent Subject Matter Eligibility. Recent Patent Subject Matter Eligibility Decision (Berkheimer v. HP. Inc.) (April 19, 2018, hereinafter “Berkheimer Memo”).

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